REPENT! (‘Cause it’s Awesome!)

Repentance has a bad reputation. For a long time, thinking of repentance brought up images of crazy people insisting the world was ending imminently, confessions of sins, guilt and other extremely negative ideas. Add on top of this that Christ explicitly tells his followers to call people to repentance as one of his final acts in the New Testament, and you get to add guilt for not telling people to repent to the list of negatives.

However, lately I’ve begun to think of repentance differently, all thanks to one simple idea. That idea was the realization that the importance of repentance comes not from the guilt nor even the forgiveness, but rather from it’s utility in promoting positive changes in our lives. This leads one to conclude that the main process for accomplishing repentance is to choose to make positive changes — to try to be a better person. When I changed my perspective in this way, the negativity associated with guilt was swept away, replaced by the recognition that we are always falling short of our divine potential, and can make incremental changes constantly in an effort to become better people. The awesome part about this is that whenever we are trying to do what we believe is right, and are trying to become better, His forgiveness makes it possible for us to push forward without the baggage of guilt for the past.

As I began thinking of repentance this way, I realized that although there may be occasions when a more formal confession-forgiveness type of repentance event is necessary, more often than not, what is required is an attitude of repentance — a penitent perspective. Again, though, it is important to slough the the negative connotations from those words and our attitudes. We might regret or be frustrated by our blunders and imperfections, but the key purpose of those emotions should be motivation to continue to try to be better.

The Atonement provided by our Savior makes it possible for us to be forgiven of our sins if we repent. That doesn’t mean we have to be perfect after repenting. That means if we are constantly repenting and trying to be more perfect, even while knowing that we will never be perfect through our own efforts, that brief periods of perfection can be attainable, as the history of our mistakes is washed clean through the grace of the Atonement. Perhaps rather than aiming to be perfect, we should aim to repent faster than we sin.

The peace available through the Gospel comes from knowing that we are reconciled to God and that all will be well in the end. Learning to live habitually repentant can help us have this peace more often, regardless of the chaos swirling around us.

Repent! It’s awesome!

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About thelogicalmormon

Devout Mormon. Graduate of MIT. Father. Technologist.

2 responses to “REPENT! (‘Cause it’s Awesome!)”

  1. Chris Myers says :

    That is an awesome way to think about repentance. Repentance, it does a soul good. Now and forever.

  2. Daniel Moore says :

    I remember in the old missionary discussions that the fourth principle of the second discussion was “Repentance”, and the final sentence of the principle in the discussion manual was, “When we repent, we begin in earnest the process of making ourselves more like Jesus Christ.”

    I thought that was such a better view of repentance than I had had up to that point, and I thought it was strange that as a lifelong member of the LDS Church that it came as such a revelation to me when, in fact, it was in the second lesson we were to teach investigators.

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